Best links of the week #18

Best links of the week #17

Reading Time: 2 minutes

Best links of the week from 29nd April to 5th May

Source: Dilbert.

Links

  1. This Will Be The Biggest Disruption In Higher Education at Forbes.
  2. Dead Facebook users could outnumber living ones within 50 years at MIT Technology Review.
  3. To Build Truly Intelligent Machines, Teach Them Cause and Effect at QuantaMagazine.
  4. The Worlds largest listings of AI Conferences, Events and Meetups with the biggest collection of conference discount codes.
  5. 2nd International Summer School on Artificial Intelligence: From Deep Learning to Data Analytics.
  6. Microsoft launches a drag-and-drop machine learning tool at TechCrunch.
  7. Actively curated list of awesome BI tools at Jan Kyri’s GitHub.
  8. How much of human height is genetic and how much is due to nutrition at Scientific American.
  9. Announcing JupyterHub 1.0!
  10. I hate it that sometimes Jupyter notebooks don’t render properly (or take a long time to render) at GitHub. If you’ve faced similar situations, your solution is here!
  11. Cryptography That Can’t Be Hacked at QuantaMagazine.
  12. Hacker-Proof Code Confirmed at QuantaMagazine.
  13. “PUT DOWN THE DEEP LEARNING: When not to use neural networks (and what to do instead)”, a talk by Rachael Tatman. Code here.
  14. Socially-Stratified Validation for ML Fairness, another talk by Rachael Tatman.
  15. Google Books Ngram Viewer is a tool that displays a graph showing how phrases specified by you have occurred in a corpus of books through time.
  16. Why Generation Y Yuppies Are Unhappy at Wait But Why.
  17. Looking for data? You mean data? DATA? Yes, data, data and data!!
  18. Becoming a Data Scientist – Curriculum via Metromap at nirvacana.
  19. Demystifying Artificial Intelligence. What is Artificial Intelligence & explaining it from different dimensions at nirvacana.
  20. The weakening relationship between the Impact Factor and papers’ citations in the digital age at arXiv.org.
  21. Visualização GeoEspacial com R at Gabriel Sartori’s GitHub.
Continue…

Best links of the week #16

Reading Time: 2 minutes

Best links of the week from 22nd April to 28th April

You can check this comic here

Links

  1. Do more with R: drag-and-drop ggplot at InfoWorld.
  2. Apart from esquisse, the package mentioned in the link above, there is another one that allows you to drag-and-drop and plot your data: ggplotAssist.
  3. DreamRs is a French R consulting firm. In their website, they have made publicly available some shiny apps on real data, such as RATP traffic and a GitHub dashboard.
  4. VCs just invested $8 million into this startup that gave away its software for free because they noticed how much people loved it!
  5. Cheat Sheets for several softwares and concepts related to Data Science at Asif Bhat GitHub.
  6. Data Science must read articles, tutorials and useful links at Asif Bhat GitHub.
  7. Math required for Data Science at Asif Bhat GitHub.
  8. Quick overview of Statistics for Biologists (it’s useful for pretty much everybody, you don’t say no to an offer of knowledge :-).
  9. How can I show the intermediate steps of a long routine in R? at StackOverflow.
  10. ‘Friendly’ reviewers rate grant applications more highly at Nature.
  11. Calm down, everyone. Keeping dead pig cells alive is not ‘brain resuscitation’ at Los Angeles Times.
  12. Uber is sharing publicly some data!
  13. Need help on choosing the right visualization method? From data-to-viz can help you!
  14. IBM releases Diversity in Faces, a dataset with over 1 million annotated images to help fight bias at Turing Tribe.
  15. Até 2030, AI contribuirá em mais de US$ 15,7 trilhões para economia global at Computer World.
  16. A extraordinária cientista que estudou o cérebro de Einstein e revolucionou a neurociência moderna at Época Negócios.
  17. TerraBrasilis, a open access public geographical data for environmental monitoring.
Continue…

Best links of the week #15

Reading Time: 2 minutes

Best links of the week from 15th April to 21st April

Links

  1. When it comes to clustering, depending on the algorithm used, one may have a hard time determining the appropriate k (number of clusters). Some algorithms do not require it, but for the ones that do, such as k-means, you should have a look at the elbow method to evaluate the appropriate k or at the silhouette of objects regarding the clusters.
  2. Dunder Data is a professional training company dedicated to teaching data science and machine learning. There is paid and free online material.
  3. Software Carpentry, teaching basic lab skills for research computing.
  4. ROpenSci, transforming science through open data and software.
  5. mlmaisleve, conceitos rápidos e leves sobre Machine Learning 🤖.
  6. kite, Code Faster in Python with Line-of-Code Completions.
Continue…

Best links of the week #14

Best links of the week #13

Best links of the week #12

Reading Time: 1 minute

Best links of the week from 25th March to 31th March.

Links

  1. Harvard Dataverse is a repository of data currently hosting over 82 thousand datasets.
  2. The origins of the job title “data scientist” at Quartz at work.
  3. The Data Incubator offers [paid] courses and bootcamps in Data Analysis.
  4. Teenagers are better behaved and less hedonistic nowadays at The Economist.
  5. Why You Procrastinate (It Has Nothing to Do With Self-Control) at The New York Times.
  6. RATP, Régie Autonome des Transports Parisiens (English: Autonomous Operator of Parisian Transports) is data friendly!
  7. Data Science Meetups: A list of Data Science Meetups from around the world!
  8. A list of R conferences, groups and meetings at Jumping Rivers GitHub page.
Continue…

The ten first BLOTW

Reading Time: 6 minutes

Why?

I never really explained why I started the series “The Best Links of The Week”. I used to have (I still have at some level) a big problem with tabs. I assume you’ve probably already heard of compulsive hoarding, and maybe that’s an easy way to explain the situation I used to have with tabs. Whenever I found an interesting link, I’d open a tab for it and not infrequently I’d open several tabs during the reading of one tab. This along with the fact that I’m a very curious person, there is no surprise that I would always end up with *at least* a few hundreds tabs opened. It’s obvious that I was never able to read them all. Besides, there would always be some great tabs I saved to read that would get lost among the cool but not that important tabs, and that bothered me a lot.

Continue…

Best links of the week #11

Best links of the week #10